Modern female dating disorder

18 Jun

Victoria started dating her current partner in 2008 after they’d exchanged emails for months.She felt confident enough to disclose her bipolar on their fifth date and was not disappointed. “My therapist always told me that I needed to find someone who would accompany me on my journey to recovery.“Providing specific information will help dissolve some of the fear,” Little says.Hope says that learning how committed she is to managing her illness through medication, regular counseling and healthy habits went a long way to alleviating any worries her boyfriend had about dating someone with bipolar.“Both ends of the spectrum cause problems in relationships.” In a manic state, Chris can become volatile and unreliable, arguing with girlfriends over trivial matters and canceling plans with little regard to their feelings.In contrast, he says, depression leads him to withdraw and avoid girlfriends. The moment something goes wrong in a relationship, she pulls away and turns inward, deepening the rift.

“But I remember thinking, ‘He’s going to freak out when I tell him I have bipolar disorder.’” The “when and how” decision was taken out of her hands when her new love dropped a bombshell: His soon-to-be ex had bipolar and her illness was one reason they were divorcing.“A lot of couples believe that weathering these kinds of challenges is the true test of their relationship—the idea of sticking with someone for better or worse,” notes Bloch.“If a partner sticks by you through a trying situation, it can bring you closer together.” Over time, Victoria came to see that someone who couldn’t be open-minded and supportive would not be a good match.By Jodi Helmer Hope dated several men after she was diagnosed with bipolar disorder II in 2004, but none of the relationships lasted long enough to make her mental health an issue.When Hope, 45, developed feelings for a local restaurateur in 2009, she knew she would have to talk to him about her diagnosis before things got serious.