Ang dating daan church of god international

03 Jun

Variations of animistic practices occur in different ethnic groups. Its practitioners were highly respected (and some feared) in the community, as they were healers, midwives (hilot), shamans, witches andwarlocks (mangkukulam), priests/priestesses (babaylan/katalonan), tribal historians and wizened elders that provided the spiritual and traditional life of the community.

In the Visayan regions, shamanistic and animistic beliefs in witchcraft (barang) and mythical creatures like aswang (vampires), duwende (dwarves), and bakonawa (a gigantic sea serpent), may exist in some indigenous peoples alongside more mainstream Christian and Islamic faiths.

Spanish missionaries during the 16th century arrived in the Philippines noting about warrior priestesses leading tribal spiritual affairs. Although suppressed, these matriarchal tendencies run deep in Filipino society and can still be seen in the strong leadership roles modern Filipino women are assuming in business, politics, academia, the arts and in religious institutions.

Nominally animists constitute about one percent of the population.

The largest of which was the Grand Evangelical Mission (GEM) which also occurred simultaneously on 19 sites across the country.

One typical event is the role of the Catholic hierarchy during the bloodless People Power Revolution of 1986.

Then-Archbishop of Manila and de facto Primate of the Philippines, Jaime Cardinal Sin appealed to the public via radio to congregate along Epifanio de los Santos Avenue in support of rebel forces.

In the early 1960s, during a period of accelerated growth, the community grew from 200 in 1960 to 1000 by 19 by 1963.

In 1964 the National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá’ís of the Philippines was elected and by 1980 there were 64,000 Bahá’ís and 45 local assemblies.