Children and dating

13 Nov

Bowlby's colleague Mary Ainsworth identified that an important factor which determines whether a child will have a secure or insecure attachment is the degree of sensitivity shown by their caregiver: The sensitive caregiver responds socially to attempts to initiate social interaction, playfully to his attempts to initiate play.She picks him up when he seems to wish it, and puts him down when he wants to explore.Attachment also describes the function of availability, which is the degree to which the authoritative figure is responsive to the child's needs and shares communication with them.

The telephone rings or there is breakfast to prepare.

Attachment theory has become the dominant theory used today in the study of infant and toddler behavior and in the fields of infant mental health, treatment of children, and related fields.

Attachment theory (Bowlby 1969, 1973, 1980) is rooted in the ethological notion that a newborn child is biologically programmed to seek proximity with caregivers, and this proximity-seeking behavior is naturally selected.

Mainly on the basis of their reunion behaviours (although other behaviours are taken into account) in the Strange Situation Paradigm (Ainsworth et al., 1978; see below), infants can be categorized into three 'organized' attachment categories: Secure (Group B); Avoidant (Group A); and Anxious/Resistant (Group C).

There are subclassifications for each group (see below).