Dating power violence wheel

03 Nov

Domestic violence and emotional abuse are behaviors used by one person in a relationship to control the other.

Partners may be married or not married; heterosexual, gay, or lesbian; living together, separated or dating.

Domestic violence includes behaviors that physically harm, arouse fear, prevent a partner from doing what they wish or force them to behave in ways they do not want.

It includes the use of physical and sexual violence, threats and intimidation, emotional abuse and economic deprivation.

While the inside of the wheel is comprised of subtle, continual behaviors, the outer ring represents physical, visible violence.

These are the abusive acts that are more overt and forceful, and often the intense acts that reinforce the regular use of other more subtle methods of abuse.

Violence can be criminal and includes physical assault (hitting, pushing, shoving, etc.), sexual abuse (unwanted or forced sexual activity), and stalking.

Although emotional, psychological and financial abuse are not criminal behaviors, they are forms of abuse and can lead to criminal violence.

Domestic violence (also called intimate partner violence (IPV), domestic abuse or relationship abuse) is a pattern of behaviors used by one partner to maintain power and control over another partner in an intimate relationship. Anyone of any race, age, sexual orientation, religion or gender can be a victim – or perpetrator – of domestic violence.

Children in homes where there is domestic violence are more likely to be abused and/or neglected.

Most children in these homes know about the violence.

It’s not always easy to tell at the beginning of a relationship if it will become abusive.

In fact, many abusive partners may seem absolutely perfect in the early stages of a relationship.