Psychology behind dating websites

27 May

Research by other groups indicates that most people on Tinder are there primarily for entertainment, not for finding sex partners or a date (let alone true love), which may help explain the findings.The study can’t determine whether Tinder people felt worse about their bodies, whether people with low self-esteem just tend to use it more, or some other reason.That may simply be because so many more men than women use Tinder, the researchers speculate.Past research has shown that women are more discerning with their swipes than men, who swipe right more liberally.You may or may not be familiar with documentary and TV show Catfish, which chronicles the very real problem (and devastating consequences) of deception in online dating.In fact, although 94% of online daters deny that their internet profiles contain any lies, 54% of online daters reported feeling someone seriously misrepresented themselves in their profile.The fact that there is little to go on when deciding whether or not to pursue another user is where evolutionary psychology comes in.

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Research has also shown that couples tend to be similarly matched in attractiveness.

Tinder, a mobile dating app, has a reputation for facilitating hook-ups based primarily on appearance.

This is likely because the app gives users very little information other than geographic proximity, name, age and – of course – photos.

But saying yes so often with the flick of a finger comes with a risk: the much higher chance of being rejected.

“The men, in essence, are put in a position that women often find themselves in, certainly in the dating scene: They’re now being evaluated and are being determined whether or not somebody is interested in them [based on their looks],” says Petrie. And that can take a toll, perhaps, on those young men.” In future studies, the researchers plan to look at how the reasons people use Tinder—whether they’re there just to see who matches with them, to hook up or to find a partner—relates to their psychological wellbeing.